Shakespeare Houses Conservation Appeal


These are the most important literary houses in the world. Please support our appeal to conserve them for the next 400 years.

Hall's Croft, the home of Shakespeare's daughter Susanna

Work needs to be carried out on the timber frame of the building


 

Caring for 400 year old timber framed houses, like Shakespeare's Birthplace, poses a real challenge to the Trust, but it is a challenge that we take on without hesitation. The houses are prone to damp, infestations of death watch beetle and distortion of the timber frames. Over the next 10 years we will undertake a programme of conservation work across the Houses starting with urgent works at Hall's Croft.

 

We are inviting you to support this work in caring for these houses and conserving the legacy that Shakespeare and his family have left for us for another 400 years.

 

The five timber framed houses are all closely connected with Shakespeare and include his Birthplace, the site of New Place where he wrote and died, the cottage where he courted his wife Anne, his grandparents’ farm where his mother grew up and the marital home of his daughter Susannah. The houses are unique and we welcome hundreds of thousands of visitors through our doors every year from primary school groups  learning about what life was like for a Tudor child to Shakespeare Pilgrims for whom standing in the room Shakespeare was born is often a lifelong ambition.

 

Urgent conservation work at Hall’s Croft

The most urgent conservation work is currently being carried out at Hall’s Croft. The house is suffering from rot in the timbers which has lead to a distortion of the frame that has now reached a critical condition.  The current work at Hall’s Croft will involve adding props to existing beams, introducing steel cleats for support and adding external timber plates to bridge over weakened joints.  This will stabilise the house while we plan for a longer-term conservation solution. Please support the Shakespeare Houses Conservation Appeal if you can.